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Junior League of Ogden Archives

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Junior League of Ogden Archives

Table of Contents

Collection Overview

Collection Inventory+/-

    Biographical Note/Historical Note

    Content Description

    Collection Use

    Administrative Information

    Subjects

    Collection Overview +/-

    Title: Junior League of Ogden Archives
    Dates: 1914-1984 (inclusive)
    Collection Number: MS 028
    Summary: Arrangement of the archives (MS 28) is chronological and alphabetical. For the most part, the records have been retained in their original filing order. Included as records are: administrative accounts; annual reports; articles of incorporation and by-laws (originals and updates); audits; correspondence; financial statements; minutes of meetings; news clippings; newsletters; photographs; and project files. Photographs were separated from the manuscript materials and processed as Photograph Collection No. 21 (P 21). A separate inventory of the photograph collection is available upon request.
    Repository: Stewart Library Special Collections
    Address:
    Weber State University
    2901 University Circle
    Ogden UT 84408

    Collection Inventory +/-

    Biographical Note/Historical Note +/-

    The beginning of the 20th Century marked the start of an era of political and economic emancipation for American women. One of the first persons to sense the change and to recognize that new rights for women implied new responsibilities toward their communities was a young New York debutante, Mary Harriman (Mrs. Charles Carey Rumsey). With the help of Natalie Henderson (Mrs. Joseph R. Swan) she started, in 1901, the JUNIOR LEAGUE FOR THE PROMOTION OF SETTLEMENT MOVEMENTS. As a result young women were encouraged to take part in active community service and to find useful outlets for their interests and abilities.

    So successful was the New York LEAGUE that in 1907, a group in Boston was organized, followed in rapid succession by groups in Brooklyn, Portland, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Chicago. In 1912, six of these seven existing LEAGUES met for the first national conference. Since 1917, they have been meeting annually to adopt constitutional changes, share experiences, and learn from experts new developments in the various fields of LEAGUE activity.

    In 1921, the ASSOCIATION OF THE JUNIOR LEAGUES OF AMERICA INC., was formed by the 30 LEAGUES then in existence. In order to establish closer contact between the LEAGUES and the ASSOCIATION, the country was divided into six regions, each with a director who served on the ASSOCIATION Board.

    To offer the LEAGUES competent professional assistance, the ASSOCIATION in 1928, appointed a Executive Secretary and began to develop its own professional staff. Field service was initiated in 1932 to provide individual consultation for LEAGUES in terms of their local needs and resources. The Junior League Magazine, published since 1911, has provided an excellent means of unifying the member LEAGUES and the ASSOCIATION.

    In 1969, the ASSOCIATION OF JUNIOR LEAGUES OF AMERICA, INC., formed a Study and Development Committee to make an in-depth study of its structure, goals and ability to serve the member LEAGUES. In 1971, Delegates at Annual Conference voted to change the name to THE ASSOCIATION OF JUNIOR LEAGUES INCORPORATED, since there were now LEAGUES representing the United States, Canada and Mexico. These same delegates approved and “option” to remain active until age 45.

    At Annual Conference 1972, after an extensive two-year study, a proposal to decentralize the ASSOCIATION was unanimously approved. This changed fourteen Regions with one Director serving twelve to twenty LEAGUES to six Areas within an Area Director, a Director-at-Large, a staff, and seven to nine council members serving from thirty-one to forty-three LEAGUES. The ASSOCIATION Board was changed to consist of the fire elected officers, six Area Directors, six Directors-at-Large, the ASSOCIATION Nominating Chairman and the Assistant ASSOCIATION Nominating Chairman. There would still be an ASSOCIATION Office in New York. At this time there were 222 member LEAGUES comprising approximately 110,000 members. The 1972 delegates also approved that the “option” to remain active be changed back to age 42, and they did not approve a controversial “open admissions” amendment.

    The JUNIOR LEAGUE idea is built upon the principle of preparing its members for intelligent and effective citizenship. At the present time, JUNIOR LEAGUES are assisting in educational and welfare fields. They are known primarily, however, for their initiative in discerning needs in their communities and demonstrating through their projects the means of fulfilling them. The purpose of the ASSOCIATION is to unite the member LEAGUES and to promote their individual purposes by offering them leadership and assistance. It is an advisory, not a supervisory, organization. The LEAGUES are self-directing and are bound only by the provisions of the ASSOCIATION Bylaws and by such policies and procedures as they themselves may adopt in ASSOCIATION annual meetings for their own guidance.

    THE MARTHA SOCIETY

    The MARTHA SOCIETY had its beginning in the efforts of Mrs. Martha Brown Cannon, who called together a group of Ogden’s prominent women interested in general charitable work. These ladies met at the home of Mrs. Cannon in October 1906, and organized the Ogden Charitable Committee, choosing Mrs. Cannon as President. The principal purpose of the MARTHA SOCIETY was to do charitable work among the poor and needy of Ogden. On March 2, 1986, death claimed the President of the SOCIETY, and at a subsequent meeting the name of the organization was changed to THE MARTHA SOCIETY in memory of its founder.

    A constitution was adopted September 27, 1908, with the following 28 ladies as charter members:

    MRS. F. J. KIESEL

    MRS. E. M. CONOROY

    MRS. H. H. SPENCER

    MRS. ELWOOD MATSON

    MRS. E. H. LITTLEFIELD

    MRS. J. S. CORLEW

    MRS. A. P. BIGELOW

    MRS. CHRIS FLYGARE

    MRS. A. S. CONDON

    MRS. AD KUHN

    MRS. NETTIE ECCLES

    MRS. ABE KUHN

    MRS. J. S. LEWIS

    MRS. THOMAS FITZGERALD

    MRS. A. P. HIBBS

    MRS. E. I. RICH

    MRS. ADAM PATTERSON

    MRS. J. H. SPRAGO

    MRS. I. L. REYNOLDS

    MRS. MARY ARMSTRONG

    MRS. P. HEALY

    MRS. JOS. SCOWCROFT

    MRS. G. L. BECKER

    MRS. THOMAS D. DEE

    MRS. M. S. BROWNING

    MRS. H. W. NAISBIT

    MRS. DAVID ECCLES

    MRS. R. T. HUME

    The constitution was amended and revised April 23, 1917. During the intervention period the work had changed materially. A day nursery where mothers who were working might leave their children was planned. A suitable location was secured at 717 25th Street, and the SOCIETY opened the nursery to the public June 14, 1913. It was later moved to 2650 Madison Avenue. The attendance at the day nursery was small, but the crying demand for a day and night nursery was apparent. In October 1914, the nursery moved to the large residence of the late Lorin Farr at the corner of 21st and Washington Avenue where the work was extended to provide for day and night care of children. The MARTHA SOCIETY NURSERY was given to the home. Attendance increased rapidly, reaching as many as 64 per day. In December 1917, with the help of friends, Ogden businessmen and members of the SOCIETY, the quarter at North Street and Washington Avenue were purchased. Repairs and alterations were made at intervals. Large dormitories were added to the building, clothes lockers were built and individual toilet compartments for brushes, combs, toothbrushes, etc., were placed in the bathrooms; thus making it of the most up-to-date homes for children in the State.

    In 1925, THE MARTHA SOCIETY has an active membership of 35. The main work of the SOCIETY was the conducting of the nursery, the capacity of which was 60. The nursery was under the direct management of the SOCIETY, which was divided into the following committees: Investigating, House, Supplies, Purchasing and Accounting, Health, Library, and Recreation and Grounds.

    The nursery was operated with a budget, and the books were audited annually. It was operated by appropriations from the State, County, and City, proceeds from the annual MARTHA BALL, and annual dues and contributions from members and friends of the SOCIETY. Parents who were able to furnish part of the keep of their children were asked to pay a small fee. The average daily enrollment in 1925 was 45. Running expenses averaged about $10,000 per year.

    In the years to follow, various changes began to take place in the MARTHA SOCIETY. THE MARTHA JUNIOR SOCIETY gradually assumed all responsibility for hospital cases. They also assisted in social activities.

    In 1934, a government nursery school was organized in connection with the MARTHA NURSERY, and in 1936 the house was remodeled to conform to new demands. At that time it was a model home with an average of 40 children being cared for.

    In 1938, the SOCIETY yielding to changed conditions in the field of child welfare work, closed the nursery, and the children were placed in foster homes in accordance with the new governmental Dependent Children Benefit Program.

    Opportunity for work along other lines soon presented itself, however. A bed at the Dee Hospital was maintained by the SOCIETY for the benefit of men and boys. Use of the bed was limited to heads of families and breadwinners with the aim of bringing back a life of usefulness to those who were found to be incapacitated for want of medical or surgical care. This was a field of civic helpfulness which previously had not been covered. Through the efforts of THE MARTHA SOCIETY, with generous cooperation of the hospital and the medical profession, a work of vital value to the community was being carried forward.

    The last history written by members of THE MARTHA SOCIETY ended with these words: “...the SOCIETY will not stop here. From our background of experience and service, we plan a fit in with modern tendencies in an enlarged program of welfare work to be developed in the near future.”

    THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OGDEN

    Becoming a member of the ASSOCIATION OF JUNIOR LEAGUES OF AMERICA in February, 1953, the principle of the JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OGDEN began nineteen years before when on March 27, 1934, fourteen women banded together to form the WELFARE LEAGUE OF OGDEN. Under the enthusiastic direction of Dolores Eccles, these women set out to achieve the goal of becoming a Junior League. Included in that group were:

    MRS. MARY ARTHUR

    MRS. LUCILLE HAMMOND

    MRS. DARYL B. BADGER

    MRS. DOROTHY RICH

    MRS. LILLIAN WILKINS

    MRS. IDA H. SCOWCROFT

    MRS. EDNA DUMKE

    MRS. CONNIE L. SCOWCROFT

    MRS. DOLORES ECCLES

    MRS. PHYLLIS WATTIS

    MRS. ELLEN S. ECCLES

    MRS. HARRIET WRIGHT

    MRS. HOPE ECCLES

    MRS. RUTH P. ECCLES

    The first project of THE WELFARE LEAGUE was the establishment of a highly successful Well-Baby clinic in 1934, Eugene Smith. For eight years, the clinic was financed by hosting annual bridge teas and fashion shows.

    Between 1938 and 1942, THE WELFARE LEAGUE took an active leadership in projects such as: the Community Chest Dental Clinic; the Dee Hospital Rumor Clinic; the Public Health Nurse Program; the Immunization Clinic; and the sponsorship of children’s plays and puppet shows. The outbreak of war curtailed much of the clinical work, and in late 1942, the LEAGUE became temporarily inactive in order to support the national war effort. Members assisted in sending “Bundles to Britain”, working with the Red Cross and furnishing a recreation room at Hill Field. In the spring of 1945, the LEAGUE resumed its active status and again assisted at the Well- Baby Clinic and at the newly organized YWCA.

    From 1950 to 1953, THE WELFARE LEAGUE expanded into the fields of education, community arts, and a volunteer service bureau. With acceptance of membership into the ASSOCIATION OF JUNIOR LEAGUES, THE WELFARE LEAGUE became the JUNIOR LEAGUE OF WELFARE LEAGUE, THE JUNIOR LEAGUE expanded its programs and projects by increased participation in health and welfare programs. Among these were programs dealing with mental retardation, the Golden Hours Center, the Utah School for the Deaf and Blind, PACT (Parents and Children Together), the Shelter Workshop, the Juvenile Court, Child Advocacy, the Independence Center for the Handicapped. The LEAGUE also became active in the environmental and aesthetic arts, particularly the Eccles Community Art Center, the Community Arts Council, the Youth Symphony Concert, the Christmas Village, historical preservation, the Old Time Fiddlers Contest, and puppetry.

    Of prominent concern to THE JUNIOR LEAGUE was the need for enrichment programs which emphasized education. Among these were the Career Development Program, the Junior Great Books, Weber County Library, Docents Program, Humane Ethics, the Nature Center and scholarships endowments.

    To raise money to support these projects, THE JUNIOR LEAGUE conducted a variety of activities including the annual rummage sale, the Charity Ball, the Miscellaneous Mart, cookbook sales, and the Avon Futures of Ogden Tennis Tournament.

    In addition to participation in community services, THE JUNIOR LEAGUE contributed thousands of dollars to worthy organizations in the Ogden area. Financial assistance was extended to the Community Welfare Council, the Ogden Community Arts Council, the Parents and Children Together program, the Nature Center, the Weber County Library, the Family Support Center, and restoration of the Union Station. Upon closure of the Martha Home in 1959, THE JUNIOR LEAGUE donated an acoustical sound shell to Ogden High School.

    As in all JUNIOR LEAGUE service, volunteers receive training and supervision, and never attempt to take the place of professionals. Rather, they provide vital supplementary services. Often the very fact that a worker is a volunteer encourages people to accept such services more readily than they would from a professional.

    The past is but a prologue. Whatever tomorrow’s challenge may be, THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OGDEN, will continue to develop programs and prepare its members to meet life’s demands.

    Content Description +/-

    Manuscript Collection 28 (MS 28) comprises thirty-one (31) boxes of records chronicling the activities of The Junior League of Ogden (1953 - 1984) and its predecessors, The Martha Society (1914 - 1941) and The Welfare League of Ogden (1933 - 1953). From the files of these three organizations comes a history of volunteer and charitable services spanning nearly a century. Records of the Martha Society (1914 - 1941): Financial records and yearbooks pertaining to the work of Ogden’s earliest charitable organization. Among its projects were a day nursery for the children of working mothers (The Martha Home), and hospital care for low income male heads of households incapacitated by illness or injury. Records of the Welfare League of Ogden (1933 - 1953): Administrative and financial records pertaining to the League’s participation in such projects as: the Well-Baby Clinic; the Community Chest Dental Clinic; and Public Health Nurse Program; the Immunization Clinic; and the Dee Hospital Tumor Clinic. Records of the Junior League of Ogden (1953 - 1984): Administrative and financial records pertaining to the admission of the Ogden League to the Association of Junior Leagues and its subsequent participation in such programs as: The Shelter Workshop; the Juvenile Court; the Crisis Center; the Community Arts Center; the Youth Symphony Concert; the Career Development Program; the Junior Great Books; Reading in Fundamental; the Nature Center; historic preservation; Avons Future Tennis Tournament; and Drug Abuse Prevention.

    Collection Use +/-

    Restrictions on Access:

    Both the archives and the photograph collection are restricted. Written permission from the President of The Junior League of Ogden is prerequisite to the reproduction of any information or photograph pertaining to the League.

    Administrative Information +/-

    Arrangement:

    Arrangement of the archives (MS 28) is chronological and alphabetical. For the most part, the records have been retained in their original filing order. Included as records are: administrative accounts; annual reports; articles of incorporation and by-laws (originals and updates); audits; correspondence; financial statements; minutes of meetings; news clippings; newsletters; photographs; and project files. Photographs were separated from the manuscript materials and processed as Photograph Collection No. 21 (P 21). A separate inventory of the photograph collection is available upon request.

    Acquisition Information:

    donated by Junior League of Ogden, 1984

    Creator:

    Junior League of Ogden

    Language:

    Sponsor:

    Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant, 2007-2008

    Quantity:

    41 boxes

    Language of the Finding Aid:

    English

    Author of the Finding Aid:

    Sarah Langsdon

    EAD Creation Date:

    2011

    Standard:

    Finding aid based on DACS

    Subjects +/-

    Corporate Names:

    Junior League of Ogden
    Martha Society
    Ogden (Utah)

    Subject Terms:

    Social Life and Customs
    Clubs and Societies
    Women--Societies and clubs

    Personal Names:

    Eccles, Bertha

    Family Names:

    Dee
    Browning
    Wattis
    Littlefield
    Rich

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